One Month Out

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

Ciao a tutti! It’s been a while. I apologize for the absence on my blog. I’ll admit that I do miss blogging daily from Florence/Europe. It’s been exactly one month since our jet left the tarmac at Florence Peretola Airport. And now it feels as though my entire freshman year is a distant dream, unattainable to reach again. I’m going to be very honest with you. The first two weeks in the United States was very hard. The immediate symptoms of reverse culture shock hit me like the wind in my face caused by the ATAF bus that blew past me every at 8:42 AM on my way to class. I felt lost and unsure of my place at home, since I had been away for so long. I realized friendships had changed, and old habits felt uncomfortably foreign. But with work and time, I gradually began to feel more at ease and confident with my life back at home. One of the worst feelings of the world is not feeling in control. And for those first two weeks, I felt anything from in control. Now I’m working 40 hours a week and cherishing my weekends. I’m exercising as much as I can and eating as much as I can that doesn’t come out of a packaged, plastic bag. On Father’s Day, I even got back on the racquetball court with my grandpa who revived my competitive spirit.

I also had some friends give me a harsh yet greatly reality check. I was reminded of my privilege for spending nine months abroad– one that many are not presented with during their entire lives. As I complained about little peeves in the United States, Vasudha told me to be grateful I’m not living in a third world country. These messages prompted me to shift my mindset. I forgave myself for having a challenging time adjusting due to missing Florence tremendously, and I started to get really excited for the next adventure to come in Poughkeepsie starting in the fall. The freshmen who were in Florence are now super pumped to start our American college careers on a traditional college campus. There’s so much to look forward to (decorating our rooms fully, joining clubs, playing sports), and the option of another experience abroad is tangible. I thank technology for allowing us to stay in touch. We reminisce about our year through iMessages, phone calls, and letters too. Although we will never relive our freshman year abroad, I truly believe we will carry the lessons, challenges we overcame, and travels with us for the remaining of our college careers and beyond.

My schedule has shifted vastly now that I’m back in the States. I’ve quickly come to terms with the fact that kids & teenagers should be in no rush to be an ‘adult’; forty hour weeks are not the most luxurious privileges of being an adult! I am thoroughly enjoying my internships– learning a lot about the corporate world. This introduction through both internships is really beneficial to my education and career goals. Here’s what my typical day looks like:

6:15 Wake up

6:45 Leave the house

7:20 Arrive in Manchester

8:30 Start work

10:00 Fifteen minute break (walk)

12:00 Thirty minute (unpaid) lunch

15:00 Fifteen minute break (walk)

17:00 Finish work

17:15 Work out in the gym or at the local park

18:15 Leave Manchester

18:45 Leave the grocery store

19:15 Arrive home and cook, eat, shower, and unwind for the day

21:00 In bed! Reading or Netflix

21:30 Lights out

It’s a brutal schedule, but it makes up for my rather leisurely days in beautiful Florence. Several of my friends are visiting my home away from home this summer, and I’ve written up an itinerary for them! Look out for further posts soon. Thanks for stickin’ with me! xo ~ e.

 

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